Physiotherapy & Rehabilitation

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PHYSIOTHERAPY & REHABILITATION

Shrimann Superspeciality Hospital has a newly developed physiotherapy department with a team of young doctors who are adept at handling patients going through chronic and acute nerve or ortho related problems.

MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS SUCH AS :

BACK PAIN

Back Pain is a very common complaint. Even though back pain can affect people of any age, it is significantly more common among adults aged between 35 and 55 years. Pain in the lower back may be linked to the bony lumbar spine, discs between the vertebrae, ligaments around the spine and discs, spinal cord and nerves, lower back muscles, abdomen and pelvic internal organs, and the skin around the lumbar area. Pain in the upper back may be due to disorders of the aorta, tumours in the chest, and spine inflammation.

CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME

People with CTS experience numbness, tingling, or burning sensations in the thumb and fingers, in particular, the index and middle fingers and radial half of the ring finger, because these receive their sensory and motor function (muscle control) from the median nerve. Ache and discomfort can possibly be felt more proximally in the forearm or even the upper arm. Less-specific symptoms may include pain in the wrists or hands, loss of grip strength, and loss of manual dexterity.

TENNIS ELBOW

Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) is a painful condition that occurs when tendons in your elbow are overloaded, usually by repetitive motions of the wrist and arm.

Despite its name, athletes aren't the only people who develop tennis elbow. People whose jobs feature the types of motions that can lead to tennis elbow include plumbers, painters, carpenters and butchers.

The pain associated with tennis elbow may radiate from the outside of your elbow into your forearm and wrist. Pain and weakness may make it difficult to Shake hands or grip an object, turn a doorknob and Hold a coffee cup.

FROZEN SHOULDER

Frozen shoulder is a condition that affects your shoulder joint. It usually involves pain and stiffness that develops gradually, gets worse and then finally goes away. This can take anywhere from a year to 3 years.

SPRAIN / STRAIN

A sprain is a stretched or torn ligament. Ligaments are tissues that connect bones at a joint. Falling, twisting, or getting hit can all cause a sprain. Ankle and wrist sprains are common. Symptoms include pain, swelling, bruising, and being unable to move your joint. You might feel a pop or tear when the injury happens.

ARTHRITIS

Arthritis is not a single disease; it is an informal way of referring to joint pain or joint disease. There are more than 100 different types of arthritis and related conditions. People of all ages, sexes and races can and do have arthritis, and it is the leading cause of disability. More than 50 million adults and 300,000 children have some type of arthritis. It is most common among women and occurs more frequently as people get older.

Common arthritis joint symptoms include swelling, pain, stiffness and decreased the range of motion. Symptoms may come and go. They can be mild, moderate or severe. They may stay about the same for years but may progress or get worse over time. Severe arthritis can result in chronic pain, inability to do daily activities and make it difficult to walk or climb stairs

There are different types of arthritis

  • Degenerative Arthritis
  • Inflammatory Arthritis
  • Infectious Arthritis
  • Metabolic Arthritis

SCIATICA

The term sciatica describes the symptoms of leg pain—and possibly tingling, numbness, or weakness—that originate in the lower back and travel through the buttock and down the large sciatic nerve in the back of each leg.

is often characterized by one or more of the following symptoms:

  • Constant pain in only one side of the buttock or leg (rarely in both legs)
  • Pain that is worse when sitting
  • Weakness, numbness, or difficulty moving the leg, foot, and/or toes
  • A sharp pain that may make it difficult to stand up or walk
  • Leg pain that is often described as burning, tingling, or searing (versus a dull ache)
  • Pain that radiates down the leg and possibly into the foot and toes (it rarely occurs only in the foot)

OSTEOARTHRITIS

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting millions of people worldwide. It occurs when the protective cartilage on the ends of your bones wears down over time.

Although osteoarthritis can damage any joint in your body, the disorder most commonly affects joints in your hands, knees, hips and spine.

Osteoarthritis symptoms often develop slowly and worsen over time. Signs symptoms of osteoarthritis include:

  • Pain. Your joint may hurt during or after movement.
  • Tenderness. Your joint may feel tender when you apply light pressure to it.
  • Grating sensation. You may hear or feel a grating sensation when you use the joint.
  • Loss of flexibility. You may not be able to move your joint through its full range of motion.
  • Stiffness. Joint stiffness may be most noticeable when you wake up in the morning or after a period of inactivity.
  • Bone spurs. These extra bits of bone, which feel like hard lumps, may form around the affected joint.

RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that can affect more than just your joints. In some people, the condition also can damage a wide variety of body systems, including the skin, eyes, lungs, heart and blood vessels.

An autoimmune disorder, rheumatoid arthritis occurs when your immune system mistakenly attacks your own body's tissues.

Unlike the wear-and-tear damage of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis affects the lining of your joints, causing a painful swelling that can eventually result in bone erosion and joint deformity.

The inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis is what can damage other parts of the body as well. While new types of medications have improved treatment options dramatically, severe rheumatoid arthritis can still cause physical disabilities.

Signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis may include :

  • Tender, warm, swollen joints
  • Fatigue, fever and weight loss
  • Joint stiffness that is usually worse in the mornings and after inactivity
  • Early rheumatoid arthritis tends to affect your smaller joints first — particularly the joints that attach your fingers to your hands and your toes to your feet.

ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES

A rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that surround the shoulder joint, keeping the head of your upper arm bone firmly within the shallow socket of the shoulder. A rotator cuff injury can cause a dull ache in the shoulder, which often worsens when you try to sleep on the involved side.Rotator cuff injuries occur most often in people who repeatedly perform overhead motions in their jobs or sports. Examples include painters, carpenters, and people who play baseball or tennis. The risk of rotator cuff injury also increases with age.

KNEE LIGAMENT INJURIES

A ligament is a short band of tough fibrous connective tissue composed mainly of long, stringy collagen molecules. Ligaments connect bones to other bones in and around joints. They do not connect muscles to bones; that is the function of tendons. Ligaments limit the amount of mobility of a joint or prevent certain movements altogether.

You can injure a ligament through a sharp change in direction, landing wrong from a jump, or the most common a blunt force hit to the knee, such as in football tackle. The incident usually needs to happen at speed. Muscle weakness or incoordination predispose you to a ligament sprain or tear.

POST-SURGICAL REHAB

Recovering from Orthopedic Surgery can sometimes require a team of physicians and professionals that are well versed in the individual needs and requirements of orthopaedic procedures. Many times after orthopaedic surgery the patient will be assigned a rehabilitation team that will work closely with the Orthopedic surgeon and other related physicians to help the patient achieve movement and motion.

POST FRACTURE REHAB, POST-ACL RECONSTRUCTION PHYSIOTHERAPY, POST-MENISCAL SURGERY, PHYSIOTHERAPY

A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open or compound fracture. Fractures commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the bone.

NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS SUCH AS :

NERVE IMPINGEMENT

A pinched nerve occurs when there is “ compression”(pressure) on a nerve.

The pressure may be the result of repetitive motions. Or it may happen from holding your body in one position for long periods, such as keeping elbows bent while sleeping.

STROKE/CVA

A stroke is a "brain attack". It can happen to anyone at any time. It occurs when blood flow to an area of the brain is cut off. When this happens, brain cells are deprived of oxygen and begin to die. When brain cells die during a stroke, abilities controlled by that area of the brain such as memory and muscle control are lost and conditions like hemiparesis occur which can be treated in physiotherapy department with motor strengthening, functional training etc.

PARKINSON'S DISEASE

Parkinson's Disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder and the most common movement disorder. It is characterized by progressive loss of muscle control, which leads to trembling of the limbs and head while at rest, stiffness, slowness, and impaired balance. As symptoms worsen, it may become difficult to walk, talk, and complete simple tasks.

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS (MS)

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a potentially disabling disease of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system).

Sports injuries

Sports injuries are common in these days. It can occur due to improper playing, hit or inadequate warm-up, lack of conditioning or overtraining.

  • Ankle Sprain
  • groin pull
  • Hamstring strain
  • Shin splints
  • Patellofemoral syndrome etc.

can be benefited with physiotherapy. Our department is fully equipped with Cold fomentation and latest electrotherapy units. It helps to treat the injury and train the athlete.

Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy

We specialize in the prevention, active rehabilitation and compensation of patients with diseases and injuries in lung and hearts. These diseases are-

  • COPD-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
  • Asthma
  • Bronchiectasis
  • Emphysema
  • Additionally inpatient cardiorespiratory physiotherapy in
  • VAP-Ventilator Acquired Pneumonia
  • Aspirated Pneumonia
  • Respiratory Infections

Post Cardiac Physiotherapy to train the patient's endurance early mobility.Bronchitis

Facilities we have for Patients

  • Advanced Shoulder Exercise Unit
  • Full Body Vibrator for Toning and Retaliation
  • Quadriceps Exercise Unit
  • NeuroRehabilitation unit
  • Lumbar and Cervical Traction
  • Long Wave Diathermy (One of its kind in the City)
  • Super advanced diagnostic combination machine
    1. Chronaxie
    2. Rheobase
    3. Curve
  • Challenge Advance Combo Electrotherapy Machine.
    1. Treadmill, Gumballs and Whole General Conditioning Equipment.
    2. Multi Equipped Gym
    3. Gait Training
    4. All types of Ambulatory Aids
    5. Microwave Diathermy
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